China's Cities in Different Features 49 Cites

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Hangzhou
Province: Zhejiang
Living cost: High
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Hangzhou, as the capital of Zhejiang Province in Eastern China, Hangzhou's climate is humid subtropical with four distinctive seasons, characteristiced by long, very hot, humid summers and chilly, cloudy and drier winters (with occasional snow). Its traffic is convenient for people’s life. For foreign students, hangzhou is served by the Hangzhou Xiaoshan International Airport, which provides direct service to many international destinations such as Thailand, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, India, Vietnam, Ethiopia, Singapore, and the Netherlands Hangzhou has a large student population with many higher education institutions based in the city. Public universities include Zhejiang University, Zhejiang University of Technology, and Hangzhou Normal University etc. Owing to different needs,more and more students come to study in this city .

Chengdu
Province: Sichuan
Living cost: High
City scale: Big
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Chengdu, formerly romanized as Chengtu, is the provincial capital of Sichuan province in Southwest China, as well as a major city in Western China. It holds sub-provincial administrative status. The administrative area houses 14,047,625 inhabitants: 7,415,590 within the municipality's nine urban districts and 6,632,035 in the surrounding satellite towns and counties' urban, suburb and rural area. According to the 2010 census, Chengdu is the fourth most populous city in China. Chengdu is one of the most important economic, finance, commerce, culture, transportation, and communication centers in Western China. Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport is one of the top 50 busiest airports in the world, and Chengdu Railway Station is one of the six biggest train stations in China. According to the 2007 Public Appraisal for Best Chinese Cities for Investment, Chengdu was chosen as one of the top ten cities to invest in out of a total of 280 urban centers in China. Chengdu is also popular in international company and consulates.More than 250 Fortune 500 companies and 10 consulates have established branches in Chengdu due to huge demand of Western China. In 2006, it was named China's 4th-most livable city by China Daily.

Changchun
Province: Jilin
Living cost: High
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Changchun is the capital and largest city of Jilin province, located in the northeast of the People's Republic of China, in the center of the Songliao Plain. It is administered as a sub-provincial city including counties and county-level cities, with a population of 7,674,439 at the 2010 census under its jurisdiction. The city's built-up (or metro) area, including 5 districts and 4 development areas, had a population of 3,815,270 in 2010 as Shuangyang district is not conurbated yet. The name, which means "Long Spring", originated from the Jurchen language. Known as China's Automobile City, Changchun is an important industrial base with a particular focus on the automotive sector. Apart from this industrial aspect, Changchun is also one of four "National Garden Cities" awarded by the Ministry of Construction of P.R. China in 2001 due to its high urban greening rate.

Changsha
Province: Hunan
Living cost: High
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Changsha (simplified Chinese: 长沙; traditional Chinese: 長沙; pinyin: Chángshā) is the capital of Hunan Province in south-central China, located on the lower reaches of the Xiang River, a branch of the Yangtze River. Its municipality covers an area of 11,819 square kilometres (4,563 sq mi) and, according to the 2010 Census, a population of 7,044,118 inhabitants. The city's urban area has a population of 3,617,469. Changsha was important from the time of the Qin dynasty (221–207 BC). In AD 750–1100 Changsha was a major commercial hub, and its population increased greatly. Under the Qing dynasty, from 1664, it was the capital of Hunan province, and it was a major rice market. It was besieged during the Taiping Rebellion but never fell. Changsha was the site of Mao Zedong's conversion to communism. It was the scene of major battles in the Sino-Japanese War of 1937–45 and was briefly occupied by the Japanese. Rebuilt since 1949, the city is now a major interior port and a commercial and industrial center.

Zhengzhou
Province: Henan
Living cost: High
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Zhengzhou is the capital of Henan Province located in east-central China. As a prefecture-level city, it also serves as the political, economic, technological, and educational centre of the province, as well as a major transportation hub for Central China. The city lies on the southern bank of the Yellow River, and is one of the Eight Great Ancient Capitals of China. With 8,626,505 inhabitants according to the 2010 census and 4,867,388 in its built-up area (6 urban districts + Xingyang City), the city is one of the main built up areas of Henan region. Zhengzhou is now a rapidly growing city. Greater Zhengzhou was named as one of the 13 emerging megacities or megalopolises in China in a July 2012 report by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Nanning
Province: Guangxi
Living cost: High
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Nanning (simplified Chinese: 南宁; traditional Chinese: 南寧; Zhuang: Namzningz; meaning 'South Tranquility') is the capital of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in southern China. It is known as the "Green City" because of its abundance of lush tropical foliage.

Harbin
Province: Heilongjiang
Living cost: High
City scale: Big
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Harbin (help·info) is the capital and largest city of Heilongjiang province, People's Republic of China. Holding sub-provincial administrative status, Harbin has direct jurisdiction over 9 metropolitan districts, 2 county-level cities and 7 counties. Harbin is the eighth most populous Chinese city and the most populous city in Northeast China. According to the 2010 census, the built-up area made of 7 out of 9 urban districts (all but Shuangcheng and Acheng not urbanized yet) had 5,282,093 inhabitants, while the total population of the sub-provincial city was up to 10,635,971. Harbin serves as a key political, economic, scientific, cultural and communications hub in Northeast China, as well as an important industrial base of the nation.

Jiaozuo
Province: Henan
Living cost: High
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò; Postal map spelling: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, People's Republic of China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north. Its population was 3,540,101 at the 2010 census whom 1,301,732 live in the built-up area made of 4 urban districts (Jiefang, Shanyang, Zhongzhan and Macun) and Bo'ai County being urbanized. Jiaozuo enjoys a humid subtropical climate with continental climate influences,winters are cool and relatively dry while summers are hot and often rainy.average temperature ranges from 0.3 °C in January to 27.5 °C in July.Extremes exist from -22.4 °C to 43.6 °C °C,precipitation averages 659mm.

Baoding
Province: Hebei
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Big
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Baoding (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Paoting; Chinese: 保定; pinyin: Bǎodìng) is a city in Hebei province, China, approximately 150 kilometres (93 mi) southwest of the national capital, Beijing. At the 2010 census, Baoding City had 11,194,372 inhabitants out of which 2,176,857 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of 3 urban districts and Qingyuan and Mancheng counties largely being conurbated, on 1,840 km2 (710 sq mi). Baoding is among 13 Chinese cities with a population of over 10 million, ranking seventh.

Tangshan
Province: Hebei
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Tangshan (Chinese: 唐山; pinyin: Tángshān) is a largely industrial prefecture-level city in northeastern Hebei province, People's Republic of China. It has become known for the 1976 Tangshan earthquake which measured 7.8 on the Richter scale and killed at least 255,000 residents. The city has since been rebuilt and has become a tourist attraction. The city of Tangshan is approximately 149 kilometers, 92 miles or 80 nautical miles east by south east of the country's capital city of Beijing. It takes roughly 2 hours by road to get from Tangshan to Beijing. Tangshan's prefecture population was 7,577,289 at the 2010 census, with 3,187,171 in the built-up (or metro) area made of the 6 urban core districts.

Baotou
Province: Inner Mongolia
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Baotou (Mongolian: ᠪᠤᠭᠤᠲᠤ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ Buɣutu qota; Chinese: 包头市) also known as Bugthot is the largest industrial city in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China. Governed as a prefecture-level city, its built-up (or metro) area made up of 5 urban districts is home to 2,070,801 inhabitants with a total population of over 2.65 million accounting for counties under its jurisdiction. The city's Mongolian name means "place with deer", and an alternate name is "Lucheng" (鹿城; Lùchéng), meaning "Deer City".

Chifeng
Province: Inner Mongolia
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Chifeng (Chinese: 赤峰市), also known as Ulanhad (Mongolian: ᠤᠯᠠᠭᠠᠨᠬᠠᠳᠠ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Улаанхад хот) Ulaɣanqada qota [ʊlaːnxad xɔt], "red cliff"), is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China. It borders Xilin Gol League to the north and west, Tongliao to the northeast, Chaoyang (Liaoning) to the southeast, and Chengde (Hebei) to the south. The city has a total administrative area of 90,275 square kilometres (34,855 sq mi) and has a population of 4,341,245 inhabitants. As of the 2010 census, 1,094,970 of these residents reside within in the urban districts of Hongshan, Yuanbaoshan and Songshan. However, a large part of Songshan is still rural and Yuanbaoshan is a de facto separate town 27 kilometers away from the core district of Chifeng. The city was the administrative centre of the defunct Ju Ud League (昭乌达盟; ᠵᠤᠤ ᠤᠳᠠ ᠴᠢᠭᠤᠯᠭᠠᠨ).

Huhehaote
Province: Inner Mongolia
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Hohhot (Chinese: 呼和浩特; pinyin: Hūhéhàotè; Mongolian: ᠬᠥᠬᠡᠬᠣᠲᠠ Kökeqota; Khalkha: Хөх хот Khökh khot; also romanized as Huhehot or Huhhot), abbreviated Hushi(Chinese: 呼市; pinyin: Hūshì), formerly known as Kweisui (simplified Chinese: 归绥; traditional Chinese: 歸綏; pinyin: Gūisūi), is the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China, serving as the region's administrative, economic, and cultural centre. Its population was 2,866,615 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 1,980,774 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made up of 4 urban districts. The name of the city in Mongolian means "Blue City"—Kuku-Khoto in Mongolian—although it is also wrongly referred to as the "Green City." The color blue in Mongol culture is associated with the sky, eternity and purity; in Chinese, the name can be translated as Qīng Chéng (Chinese: 青城), literally, "Blue/Green City."

Linfen
Province: Shanxi
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Linfen (simplified Chinese: 临汾; traditional Chinese: 臨汾; pinyin: Línfén) is a prefecture-level city in southern Shanxi province, People's Republic of China. It is situated along the banks of the Fen River. It has an area of 20,275 square kilometres (7,828 sq mi) and according to the 2010 Census, a population of 4,316,612 inhabitants of which 944,050 live in the built-up (or metro) area made up of Yaodu urban district. It was known as Pingyang (平阳) during the Spring and Autumn Period. In 2006, New York based Blacksmith Institute listed Linfen as one of the ten most polluted cities in the world. Prior to 1978, Linfen was famous for its spring water, greenery and rich agriculture and therefore nicknamed "The Modern Fruit and Flower Town". Since then it has been developing into a main industrial center for coal mining, which has been seriously damaging the city's environment, air quality, farming, health and its past status as a green village.

Dandong
Province: Liaoning
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Dandong (simplified Chinese: 丹东; traditional Chinese: 丹東; pinyin: Dāndōng), previously known as Andong and Antung, is a prefecture-level city in southeastern-eastern Liaoning province, and is the largest Chinese border city, facing Sinuiju, North Korea across the Yalu River, which demarcates the Sino-Korean border. To the southwest of the city, the river flows into Korea Bay. Dandong has therefore had a dynamic history because of its strategic location for the northeast's rich natural resources and because of its convenient access to the ocean. It is designated as a major export production centre for the province, and is a port city connected by rail with Shenyang and Sinuiju. A significant amount of trade with North Korea flows through the city. The size of the administrative city (prefecture) is 14,981.4 square kilometres (5,784.4 sq mi); as of 2010, the built-up area made of 3 urban districts is 830 square kilometres (320 sq mi) in size and had 865,576 inhabitants. The administrative city covers around 2.45 million inhabitants as of 2010 census. The Hushan Great Wall, the far eastern end of the Great Wall of China, is located here.

Baicheng
Province: Jilin
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Baicheng (Chinese: 白城; pinyin: Báichéng; literally: "White City") is a prefecture-level city in the northwestern part of Jilin province, People's Republic of China, bordering Inner Mongolia to the north and west and Heilongjiang to the east and northeast. At the 2010 census, 2,033,058 people resided within its administrative area of 25,683 km2 (9,916 sq mi).

Daqing
Province: Heilongjiang
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Daqing (Chinese: 大庆; pinyin: Dàqìng; formerly spelled "Taching") (pronounced Da Tshing) is a prefecture-level city in the west of Heilongjiang province, People's Republic of China. The name literally means "Great Celebration". Daqing is known as the Oil Capital of China and has experienced a phenomenal boom since oil was discovered here in 1959. Its population was 2,904,532 at the 2010 census, of whom 1,415,268 lived in the built-up area (or metro) in 4 out of the total of 5 urban districts, i.e. (Sartu, Longfeng, Ranghulu and Honggang). Anda district of Suihua is also being conurbated next.

Heihe
Province: Heilongjiang
Living cost:
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Heihe (Chinese: 黑河; pinyin: Hēihé; "Black River") is a prefecture-level city of northern Heilongjiang province, People's Republic of China, located on the Russian border, on the south bank of the Amur River, across the river from Blagoveshchensk. Heihe has an urban population of about 211,313, while the total population of the prefecture-level city is 1,673,893. Heihe marks the northeast terminus of the Heihe–Tengchong Line, which is sometimes used to divide China into east and west.

Bengbu
Province: Anhui
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Bengbu (Chinese: 蚌埠; pinyin: Bèngbù; Wade–Giles: Peng-pu) is a mid-sized city in northern Anhui Province, China. Its built-up (or metro) area made of 4 urban districts has nearly one million residents, though the Prefecture-level city under its jurisdiction had 3,164,467 registered residents at the 2010 census. Its name means "Oyster Wharf" in Chinese, echoing its former reputation as a freshwater pearl fishery. The city's urban agglomeration is about to include Huaiyuan county, which is under its jurisdiction, as well as Fengyang county in Chuzhou municipality. This contiguous built-up area would have approximately 2.6 million residents.

Hefei
Province: Anhui
Living cost: High
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Hefei, formerly known as Hofei, Luzhou, or Luchow, is the capital and largest city of Anhui Province in Eastern China. A prefecture-level city, it is the political, economic, and cultural centre of Anhui. Located in the central portion of the province, it borders Huainan to the north, Chuzhou to the northeast, Chaohu to the southeast and Lu'an to the west. Hefei has an area of 11,434.25 km2 (4,414.79 sq mi) and, at the 2013 census, a population of 7,611,000 inhabitants. Its built-up area ("metro") was home to 5,031,123 inhabitants at the 2010 census encompassing all urban districts and Feidong and Feixi counties largely being urbanized.

Huaibei
Province: Anhui
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Huaibei (Chinese: 淮北; pinyin: Huáiběi) is a prefecture-level city in northern Anhui Province, People's Republic of China. It borders Suzhou to the east, Bengbu to the south, Bozhou to the west, and the province of Henan to the north. The population was 2,114,276 inhabitants at the 2010 census, all in the built-up area, comprising 3 urban districts and Suixi County largely being built.

Huangshan
Province: Anhui
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Huangshan (simplified Chinese: 黄山; traditional Chinese: 黃山; pinyin: Huángshān; literally: "Yellow Mountains"), is a mountain range in southern Anhui province in eastern China. The range is composed of material that was uplifted from an ancient sea during the Mesozoic era, 100 million years ago. The mountains themselves were carved by glaciers during the Quaternary. Vegetation on the range is thickest below 1,100 meters (3,600 ft), with trees growing up to the treeline at 1,800 meters (5,900 ft). The area is well known for its scenery, sunsets, peculiarly shaped granite peaks, Huangshan Pine trees, hot springs, winter snow, and views of the clouds from above. Huangshan is a frequent subject of traditional Chinese paintings and literature, as well as modern photography. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and one of China's major tourist destinations. Huangshan is also the famous place for Chinese high quality teas, such as Huangshan Maofeng, Keemun Black and Blooming Tea.

Binzhou
Province: Shandong
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Binzhou (simplified Chinese: 滨州; traditional Chinese: 濱州; pinyin: Bīnzhōu; literally: "coastal prefecture") is a prefecture-level city in northern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River with two arms extended to the southern bank, Binzhou borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the southwest, Dezhou to the west, Zibo to the south, Dongying to the east, and the province of Hebei to the north. The city also has a short coastline bordering the Bohai Bay. Humans have been living in the area around Binzhou since the Neolithic era. It was called “Pugu country” in the Shang Dynasty, and was a county in the Qin Dynasty. It was first called Binzhou in era of the Five Dynasties because it borders the Bohai Sea. Nowadays, it has more than 3.7 million inhabitants. The major Industries are based on oil, chemicals and textiles.

Dongying
Province: Shandong
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Dongying (simplified Chinese: 东营; traditional Chinese: 東營; pinyin: Dōngyíng), a prefecture-level city, lies on the northern (Bohai Sea) coast of Shandong province, People's Republic of China. At the 2010 census, 2,035,338 people resided within its administrative area of 7,923.26 km2 (3,059.19 sq mi) and 998,968 in the built-up area made up of Dongying district and Kenli County largely being urbanized. Dongying is home to the Shengli Oilfield, which is, after Daqing (Heilongjiang), the second largest oilfield nationally.

Tai'an
Province: Shandong
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Tai'an (Chinese: 泰安; pinyin: Tài'ān) is a prefecture-level city in western Shandong province. Centered on Mount Tai, the city borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the north, Laiwu to the northeast, Zibo to the east, Linyi to the southeast, Liaocheng to the extreme west and Jining to the south. To the west, Tai'an is separated from the province of Henan by the Yellow River. Its population was 5,494,207 as of the 2010 census, of whom 1,735,425 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of 2 urban districts (Taishan District and Daiyue District).

Jinhua
Province: Zhejiang
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Jinhua (help·info), is a prefecture-level city in central Zhejiang province in eastern China. It borders the provincial capital of Hangzhou to the northwest, Quzhou to the southwest, Lishui to the south, Taizhou to the east, and Shaoxing to the northeast. Its population was 5,361,572 at the 2010 census including 1,077,245 in the built-up area made of two urban districts even though Lanxi City is also being conurbated soon. One can notice that the cities of Dongyang and Yiwu are now in the same agglomeration, a built-up area of 2,038,413 inhabitants bigger than the one of Jinhua itself. Jinhua is rich in red soil and forest resources. The Jinhua or Wu River flows through the Lan and Fuchun to the Qiantang River beside Hangzhou, which flows into Hangzhou Bay and the East China Sea. In mediaeval China, it formed part of the water network feeding supplies to the southern end of the Grand Canal. It is best known for its dry-cured Jinhua ham.

Wenzhou
Province: Zhejiang
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Wenzhou (About this sound listen (help·info)) (simplified Chinese: 温州市; traditional Chinese: 溫州市; pinyin: Wēnzhōu Shì; former official name: Wenchow) is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Zhejiang province in the People's Republic of China. At the time of the 2010 Chinese census, 6,642,592 people lived in its built-up (or metro) area made of Wenzhou's city proper (3,039,439 inhabitants in 3 urban districts), Ruian and Yueqing cities largely being urbanized, and Yongjia County conurbated on its southern part. The area under its jurisdiction (which includes two satellite cities and six counties) held a population of 9,122,102. Its coastline opens on the East China Sea; its borders connect it to Lishui on the west, Taizhou on the north, and Fujian to the south. The name Wenzhou, translates to "a mild and pleasant land." Originally known as Yongjia, Yung-chia or Yungkia (Chinese: 永嘉; pinyin: Yǒngjiā), Wenzhou was a prosperous foreign treaty port, which remains well-preserved today. It is situated in a mountainous region and, as a result, has been isolated for most of its history from the rest of the country, making the local culture and language very distinct not only from the rest of China but from neighbouring areas as well. It is also known for its emigrants who leave their native land for Europe and the United States, with a reputation for being entrepreneurs who start restaurants, retail and wholesale businesses in their adopted countries. People of Wenzhou origin make up a large number of ethnic Chinese residents of Italy, France, and Spain.

Changzhou
Province: Jiangsu
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Changzhou (Chinese: 常州) is a prefecture-level city in southern Jiangsu province of China. It was previously known as Yanling, Lanling, Jinling, and Wujin. Located on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, Changzhou borders the provincial capital of Nanjing to the west, Zhenjiang to the northwest, Wuxi to the east, and the province of Zhejiang to the south. The city is situated in the affluent Yangtze Delta region of China. Its total population was 4,592,431 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 3,290,918 lived in the built-up area made up of 5 urban districts. The agglomeration is now part of Shangai-Suzhou-Wuxi built-up area which has now more than 36,000,000 inhabitants, only second in China after Pearl River built-up area.

Wuxi
Province: Jiangsu
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Wuxi (simplified Chinese: 无锡; traditional Chinese: 無錫; pinyin: Wúxī) is an old city in southern Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. Split in half by Lake Tai, Wuxi borders Changzhou to the west and Suzhou to the east. The Yangtze River lies between the northern half of Wuxi and Taizhou, while the southern half of the city borders the province of Zhejiang. Wuxi is also famous for being one of the birthplaces of China's modern industry and commerce, as well as the hometown of many important businessmen who have played essential roles in building commerce in Shanghai since the early 20th century.

Dengfeng
Province: Henan
Living cost: Low
City scale:
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Dengfeng (Chinese: 登封; pinyin: Dēngfēng; Postal map spelling: Tengfeng) is a county-level city in Zhengzhou, Henan Province, China. In ancient times, it was known as Yangcheng (simplified Chinese: 阳城; traditional Chinese: 陽城; pinyin: Yángchéng). Dengfeng has an area of 1220 square kilometers and a population of 630,000. Dengfeng is located at the foot of the Mount Song, one of the most sacred mountains in China. The city is one of the most renowned spiritual centres of China, home to various religious institutions and temples, such as the Taoist Zhongyue Temple, the Buddhist Shaolin Temple, as well as the Confucian Songyang Academy, hence its poetic expression derived from Chinese literature as the spiritual "centre of heaven and earth".

Enshi
Province: Hubei
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Enshi (Chinese: 恩施; pinyin: Ēnshī) is a county-level city in and the seat of Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture, in western Hubei province, People's Republic of China. The prefecture's legislature, executive and judiciary are seated here, as well as its CPC and Public Security bureau. The entire county-level city of Enshi has an area of 3,967 square kilometres (1,532 sq mi) and a population of 780,000.

Yichang
Province: Hubei
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Yichang (Chinese: 宜昌) is a prefecture-level city located in western Hubei province, People's Republic of China. It is the second largest city in the province after the capital, Wuhan. The Three Gorges Dam is located within its administrative area, in Yiling District. At the 2010 census, its population was 4,059,686 inhabitants whom 1,350,150 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of Yiling, Xiling, Wujiagang and Dianjun urban districts as Xiating District is not conurbated yet.

Changde
Province: Hunan
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Changde (Chinese: 常德; pinyin: Chángdé) is a prefecture-level city in the northwest of Hunan province, People's Republic of China, with a population of 5,717,218 as of the 2010 census, of which 1,232,182 reside in the urban districts of Dingcheng and Wuling. In addition to the urban districts, Changde also administers the county-level city of Jinshi and six counties. Changde is adjacent to Dongting Lake to the east, the city of Yiyang to the south, Wuling and Xuefeng Mountains to the west, and Hubei province to the north. The area has been inhabited by humans since around 8,000 years ago. In that time, the city has changed names several times, but it has been known as Changde since the twelfth century. The city is well known for the Battle of Changde during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–45) and the atrocities committed then by the Imperial Japanese Army.

Chenzhou
Province: Hunan
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Chenzhou (Chinese: 郴州; pinyin: Chēnzhōu) is a city located in the south of Hunan province, People's Republic of China. Its administrative area covers 19,317 square kilometres (7,458 sq mi), 9.2% of the provincial area, and its total population reached 4,559,600 in 2001, 26% of them living in urban areas, 74% of them live in rural areas.

Hengyang
Province: Hunan
Living cost: Low
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Hengyang (simplified Chinese: 衡阳; traditional Chinese: 衡陽; pinyin: Héngyáng) is the second largest city of Hunan Province, People's Republic of China. It straddles the Xiang River about 160 km (99 mi) south of the provincial capital of Changsha.

Fuzhou
Province: Fujian
Living cost: High
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Fuzhou (Chinese: 福州; pinyin: Fúzhōu, [fǔtʂóʊ]; Fuzhou dialect: Hók-ciŭ; also formerly Minhow) is the capital and one of the largest cities in Fujian province, People's Republic of China. Along with the many counties of Ningde, those of Fuzhou are considered to constitute the Mindong (lit. East of Fujian) linguistic and cultural area. Fuzhou's core counties lie on the north (left) bank of the estuary of Fujian's largest river, the Min River. All along its northern border lies Ningde, and Ningde's Gutian County lies upriver. Fuzhou's counties south of the Min border on Putian, Quanzhou, Sanming and Nanping prefectures. Its population was 7,115,370 inhabitants as of the 2010 census, of whom 4,408,076 inhabitants are urban standing around 61.95%, while rural population is at 2,707,294 standing around 38.05 percent.

Ganzhou
Province: Jiangxi
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Ganzhou (Chinese: 赣州; pinyin: Gànzhōu), formerly romanized as Kanchow, is a prefecture-level city in southern Jiangxi province, People's Republic of China, bordering Fujian to the east, Guangdong to the south, and Hunan to the west. Its administrative seat is at Zhanggong District. Its population was 8,361,447 at the 2010 census whom 1,977,253 in the built-up (or metro) area made of Zhanggong and Nankan urban Districts and Gan County largely being urbanized.

Shantou
Province: Guangdong
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Shàntóu (Chinese: 汕头), also known as Swatow or Suátao, is a prefecture-level city on the eastern coast of Guangdong province, People's Republic of China, with a total population of 5,391,028 as of 2010 and an administrative area of 2,064 square kilometres (797 sq mi). Shantou has direct jurisdiction over six districts and one county, and the six urban districts of Shantou has a population of 5,330,764. With it and the surrounding cities of Jieyang and Chaozhou, the metropolitan region known as Chaoshan covers an area of 10,404 km2 (4,017 sq mi), and had a permanent population of 13,937,897 at the end of 2010. It's built up area spread of 11 districts was home to 11,635,577 inhabitants at the 2010 census. Shantou, a city significant in 19th-century Chinese history as one of the treaty ports established for Western trade and contact, was one of the original Special Economic Zones of the People's Republic of China established in the 1980s, but did not blossom in the manner that cities such as Shenzhen, Xiamen and Zhuhai did. However, it remains eastern Guangdong's economic centre, and is home to Shantou University, a member of the Project 211 group.

Baise
Province: Guangxi
Living cost: Low
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Baise (Chinese: 百色; local pronunciation: paːk˧˥ ɬɐk˥) is the westernmost prefecture-level city of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China, bordering Vietnam as well as the provinces of Guizhou and Yunnan.

Guilin
Province: Guangxi
Living cost: High
City scale: Small
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Guilin is a prefecture-level city in the northeast of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, situated on the west bank of the Li River, and bordering Hunan to the north. Its name means, "Forest of Sweet Osmanthus", owing to the large number of fragrant Sweet Osmanthus trees located in the city. The city has long been renowned for its scenery of karst topography and is one of China's most popular tourist destinations.

Danzhou
Province: Hainan
Living cost: Low
City scale:
Air quality: Good
City type: Humanities

Dānzhōu (Chinese: 儋州) is a city in the northwest of the Chinese island province of Hainan. It is a county-level city administered directly by the province. Although called a "city", Danzhou refers to a large land area in Hainan - an area which was once a county. Within this area is the main city, Danzhou City.

Guiyang
Province: Guizhou
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Guìyáng (Chinese: 贵阳) is the capital of Guizhou province of Southwest China. It is located in the centre of the province, situated on the east of the Yunnan–Guizhou Plateau, and on the north bank of the Nanming River, a branch of the Wu River. The city has an elevation of about 1,100 meters. It has an area of 8,034 square kilometres (3,102 sq mi). Its population is 4,324,561 at the 2010 census whom 3,037,159 live in the built up area made of 7 urban districts.

Leshan
Province: Sichuan
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Leshan (simplified Chinese: 乐山; traditional Chinese: 樂山; pinyin: Lèshān; literally: "Happy mountain"; Sichuanese Pinyin: No2san1; local pronunciation: [nʊʔ˧sã˥]) is a prefecture-level city located at the confluence of the Dadu and Min rivers in Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China. Leshan is located on the southwestern fringe of the Red Basin in southern Sichuan, about 120 km (75 mi) from Chengdu. At the 2010 census, its population was 3,235,759 whom 662,814 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of Shizhong district, as Wutongqiao and Jinkouhe districts are not conurbated yet.

Nanchong
Province: Sichuan
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Ordinary
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Nanchong (Chinese: 南充; pinyin: Nánchōng; Wade–Giles: Nan-ch'ung; Sichuanese: lan2cong1; ) is a prefecture-level city in the northeast of Sichuan province, People's Republic of China, with an area of 12,479.96 square kilometres (4,818.54 sq mi), and at the 2010 census was home to 6,278,614 people whom 1,858,875 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of 3 urban districts. It is the second most populated city of Sichuan Province, only after Chengdu. The administrative center is Shunqing District.

Luzhou
Province: Sichuan
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Luzhou (simplified Chinese: 泸州; traditional Chinese: 瀘州; pinyin: Lúzhōu; Sichuanese Pinyin: Nu2zou1; Luzhou dialect: [nu˨˩tsəu˥]), formerly transliterated as Lu-chou or Luchow, is a prefecture-level city located in the southeast of Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China. The city, named Jiangyang until the Southern and Northern Dynasties, is known as the "wine city". Situated at the confluence of the Tuo River and the Yangtze River, Luzhou is not only an important port on the Yangtze river, but also the largest port in both size and output in Sichuan province since Chongqing seceded from Sichuan province in 1997. At the 2010 census its population was 4,218,427 inhabitants whom 919,832 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of Jiangyang and Longmatan districts, as Naxi district isn't conurbated yet. Luzhou, which borders Yunnan, Guizhou and Chongqing, is the only geographic junction of the four provinces, and was therefore the logical place for a port in ancient China. After the PRC was founded in 1949, Luzhou became the capital of southern Sichuan province. In 1983, Luzhou was approved as a prefecture-level city administratively.

Chongqing
Province:
Living cost: High
City scale: Super big
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Lanzhou
Province: Gansu
Living cost: Ordinary
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Lánzhōu (simplified Chinese: 兰州; traditional Chinese: 蘭州; Postal map spelling: Lanchow) is the capital and largest city of Gansu Province in Northwest China. A prefecture-level city, it is a key regional transportation hub, allowing areas further west to maintain railroad connections to the eastern half of the country. Lanzhou is home to 3,616,163 inhabitants at the 2010 census and 2,177,130 in the built-up area (urban) of 1,088 square kilometres (420 sq mi).

Yinchuan
Province: Ningxia
Living cost: High
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Yinchuan is the capital of the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China, and former capital of the Western Xia Empire of the Tanguts. It has an area of 4,467 km (2,776 mi) and a total population of 1.99 million. Its built up area is home to 1,290,170 inhabitants spread on 3 urban districts. The name of the city literally means "silver river"; the character for "river" (Chinese: 川; pinyin: chuān) is the same as that in Sichuan, but not as those in, for example, the Yellow River (simplified Chinese: 黄河; traditional Chinese: 黃河; pinyin: Huánghé) or Yangtze River (simplified Chinese: 长江; traditional Chinese: 長江; pinyin: Chángjiāng).

Urumqi
Province: Xinjiang Uygur
Living cost: High
City scale: Small
Air quality: Ordinary
City type: Humanities

Ürümqi (/uːˈruːmtʃi/, literally "beautiful pasture", from Mongolian), is the capital of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China in the northwest of the country. Urumqi was a major hub on the Silk Road during China's Tang dynasty, and developed its reputation as a leading cultural and commercial center during the Qing dynasty. With a built-up (or metro) population of 2,988,715 as of 2010 census (6 urban and suburban districts but Dabancheng not yet urbanized) and 3.03 million in 7 urban and suburban districts, Ürümqi is the largest city in China's western interior. Since the 1990s Ürümqi has developed economically and now serves as a regional transport node, cultural, and commercial centre.

About Humanities

Humanities also means the cultural city, this kind of city combine the history of city, excellent moral character of modern people and its unique feature, like Yangzhou , Lasa, Hongkong and Taiwan and so on.

China Hot Cities

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